Skip to content

For Professionals

Lessons Learned in the Development and Implementation of Preventive Interventions for Maternal Depression

This link will bring you to a video presentation by Dr. William Beardslee on the Alberta Family Wellness Initiative website.

“Dr. William Beardslee presents on the increasingly strong evidence base for mental health promotion and prevention for children, youth and families. He emphasizes the importance of a developmental perspective by using different kinds of interventions across the span of childhood. Dr. Beardslee’s presentation discusses the benefits of a system with fully implemented mental health preventions.  He focuses specifically on parental depression and after briefly reviewing what is known about its costs and prevalence, he discusses a variety of preventive interventions that offer considerable promise. In terms of adolescents and adults, cognitive-behavioral approaches have demonstrated that it is actually possible to prevent episodes of major depression including youngsters at high risk because their parents are depressed. He advocates the potential of a prevention model in Canada.”

Parental mental illness: building understanding and resilience in children

In this article Brad Morgan, Director of  Children of Parents with a Mental Illness (COPMI), discusses the experiences of COPMI in developing resources and training in collaboration with families who have a parent with a mental illness and the professionals that work with them.  Click here for this March 12, 2014 article on the Australian Government website.

Ulysses Agreement

A Ulysses Agreement is a voluntary process that is used by a person that has a mental illness or mental health concern.  The plan outlines to others what they should and should not do to support the children and the parent/s. It also allows the parent to plan how their children will be cared for should they relapse and be temporally unable to care for their children.  This program is funded by South Fraser – Child and Youth Mental Health and provided by The British Columbia Schizophrenia Society and implemented by Mark Littlefield of Littlefield and Associates.  Click here for the pdf document.

Motherhood, Mental Illness and Recovery

From the back cover:

Despite the importance of regaining social roles during recovery from mental illness, the intersection between motherhood and serious mental illness is often overlooked. This book aims to Motherhood Mental Illness and Recoveryrectify that neglect. A series of introductory chapters describing current research and services available to mothers with serious mental illness are followed by personal accounts of clients reflecting on their parenting experiences. One goal of the book is to provide clinicians with information on this seldom addressed topic, which they can then use to help patients who are struggling with questions and barriers in their attempts to parent. The inclusion of personal accounts of mothers on issues such as stigma, fears, and discrimination in the context of parenting with a mental illness is intended to promote the message of mental illness recovery to a larger audience as well. Finally, it is hoped that this handbook will help inspire more research on mothers with mental illness and the creation of more services tailored to their needs.

http://www.springer.com/medicine/psychiatry/book/978-3-319-01317-6

http://www.amazon.com/Motherhood-Mental-Illness-Recovery-Stories/dp/3319013173

Fourth International Conference on Families with Parental Mental Health Challenges

The Fourth International Conference on Families wth Parental Mental Health Challenges took place in Berkeley, California from April 25 – 27, 2014.  The above link will bring you to the conference brochure.

Click here for a link to the conference presentations which are now available online.

Who Cares? A video by Young Carers in the UK

Practitioners Training Resource

This short film was developed by Young Carers who attend Time Out Young Carers Project in Loughborough. It raises awareness of the issues and experiences young carers have faced and it is told in their own words.

The content supports young people, teachers and other practitioners to be aware of the challenges young carers face, to gauge an understanding towards the needs of this group and to prompt discussion on how they can be better supported.

For more information click here for a link to The Jitty website.

Who Cares? from The Jitty on Vimeo.