Skip to content

Links

What I want you to know about having a parent who is mentally ill

This is an excerpt taken from an anonymous blog post at http://www.rageagainsttheminivan.com.

“Having a mental illness is a lot like having a physical illness. One of the main differences to me is, since you can’t see the injury, you might think that it is easier to overcome. If someone is missing a leg you would not expect them to jump over a hurdle easily, you would not expect a person who is deaf to focus just a little harder so that they can hear you. It’s seems like it is the same way for people who are born with or develop a mental illness. It can be frustrating to live with someone, especially when they don’t take medicine that can help them cope, but even on the best days, with the right cocktail of meds, life can be paralyzing and incredibly difficult for not only them, but the people around them.”

Click here for a direct link to the rest of the post. 

Young Carer Movement is on the Rise

Excerpt taken from the site www.thefamilycaregiver.com.

“Toiling away in silence in countless countries of the world is a veritable army of youngsters who quietly, without any fanfare, look after family members who need assistance on a daily basis. It is a labor born out of familial love, commitment and need. These youngsters – family caregivers in a very real sense – are known as ‘young carers’ in Britain, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Zambia and various other countries.  In the USA they are called ‘caregiving youth’ or ‘youth caregivers.’ But no matter what the label, or the country, research from around the world has shown these young people comprise a specific population with a unique set of needs.”

Click here for a link to the rest of the article. 

Lessons Learned in the Development and Implementation of Preventive Interventions for Maternal Depression

This link will bring you to a video presentation by Dr. William Beardslee on the Alberta Family Wellness Initiative website.

“Dr. William Beardslee presents on the increasingly strong evidence base for mental health promotion and prevention for children, youth and families. He emphasizes the importance of a developmental perspective by using different kinds of interventions across the span of childhood. Dr. Beardslee’s presentation discusses the benefits of a system with fully implemented mental health preventions.  He focuses specifically on parental depression and after briefly reviewing what is known about its costs and prevalence, he discusses a variety of preventive interventions that offer considerable promise. In terms of adolescents and adults, cognitive-behavioral approaches have demonstrated that it is actually possible to prevent episodes of major depression including youngsters at high risk because their parents are depressed. He advocates the potential of a prevention model in Canada.”

Parental mental illness: building understanding and resilience in children

In this article Brad Morgan, Director of  Children of Parents with a Mental Illness (COPMI), discusses the experiences of COPMI in developing resources and training in collaboration with families who have a parent with a mental illness and the professionals that work with them.  Click here for this March 12, 2014 article on the Australian Government website.

Children of Parents with Mental Illness

“All family members are affected by a loved one’s mental illness. The entire family system needs to be addressed. To assure us we are not to blame and the situation is not hopeless. To point us to people and places that can help our loved one. The impact still lingers on.” – Click here for a link to this article by Diane T. Marsh on the BC Council for Families website.