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Parental mental illness: building understanding and resilience in children

In this article Brad Morgan, Director of  Children of Parents with a Mental Illness (COPMI), discusses the experiences of COPMI in developing resources and training in collaboration with families who have a parent with a mental illness and the professionals that work with them.  Click here for this March 12, 2014 article on the Australian Government website.

Children of Parents with Mental Illness

“All family members are affected by a loved one’s mental illness. The entire family system needs to be addressed. To assure us we are not to blame and the situation is not hopeless. To point us to people and places that can help our loved one. The impact still lingers on.” – Click here for a link to this article by Diane T. Marsh on the BC Council for Families website.

The Fog of Paranoia: A Sister’s Journey through her Brother’s Schizophrenia

Excerpt:  In The Fog of Paranoia: A Sister’s Journey Through Her Brother’s Schizophrenia, Sarah Rae shares with us not only the sifting through the memories of growing up with her brother and the slow uncovering of his schizophrenia, but also the transition to the after — of living with a sort of survivor’s guilt and moving on with her life while still supporting her sibling. Whether or not you have personal experience with mental illness in your loved ones, the book is an honest and revealing memoir of one family’s struggle.

Click here for the link

Statistics Canada: Young Canadians providing care

“In 2012, an estimated 1.9 million young Canadians, or 27% of the population aged 15 to 29, provided some form of care to a family member or friend with a long-term health condition, disability, or aging needs. This care was provided in the 12 months preceding the survey. Canadians between the ages of 15 and 24 were equally as likely as those aged 25 to 29 to have caregiving responsibilities.” – excerpt from Statistics Canada website.  Click here for a link to the full document.